Homemade Chocolates

Hello! Several years ago, I learned how to make raw chocolates from scratch. I believe that it was a recipe by Any Phyo that I found in the book and wanted to give a try as the chocolate-making at home seemed to be a pretty straightforward process.

In reality, the process was straightforward and a bit messy, however, the results were totally worth all the efforts. The homemade chocolates were so heavenly delicious that the store-bought varieties could not come anywhere close. Since then, I experimented with many different raw chocolate recipes. There are many variations posted on the internet. Some of them recommend using fewer oils or fats and more of the cacao powder, and vice versa. Others called for different types of sweeteners such as maple syrup or honey. All these recipes turned out pretty good. One thing I want to mention is that the quality of the ingredients really matters! To get the best tasting, smooth, homogenous, bitter-sweet chocolate, use the best ingredients that are available. You want to select the ingredients that are raw, unrefined, organic, and pure (without additives or preservatives or flavors). Today, I’m sharing with you one of the recipes that I like the most; I can call it a “full-proof” recipe. Every single time I followed this recipe, I got great results. Here is the recipe.

The ingredients:

  • 1/8 cup raw, unrefined, virgin coconut oil 
  • 1/8 cup raw cacao butter
  • 1/4 cup raw coconut nectar or any other liquid sweetener (maple syrup, date syrup, or honey)
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder

  Equipment:

  • A double boiler (or a large and a small pot) for melting the coconut oil and the cacao butter
  • A wooden teaspoon
  • Silicone molds

The method of preparation:

  1. In a double boiler, bring 2 cups of water to a boil and turn the heat off. Alternatively, boil the water in a large pot and put the dry and empty smaller pot into it.
  2. Place cacao butter in the double boiler (or into a smaller pot) and allow it to melt completely. Add coconut oil and let it melt as well. This step may take a few minutes.
  3. When both fats turn into liquid, stir in the liquid sweetener of your choice.
  4. When the liquid becomes homogenous, add cacao powder and mix it all well. The final mixture looks glossy and homogenous and has a rather thick consistency.
  5. Start filling up the molds using a teaspoon. If the chocolate mixture hardens, warm it up a bit to make it liquid. Place the filled with chocolate molds into a freezer for at least 8 hours to firm up.
  6. To serve, press the chocolates out of the molds. Enjoy with tea or fresh vegetable juice. Store in a refrigerator for up to 14 days.

Enjoy! Nataliya

References: Baird, L. & Rodwel, J. (2005). The complete book of raw food. Healthy Living Books: New York, NY

Using Essential Oils

Today, I was making a room spray with the essential oils. Next time when there is a cold or flu lurking around, the essential oils can help to cleanse and sanitize the air.* Many studies have documented the antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiparasitic qualities of the pure, unadulterated essential oils (Elshafie & Camele, 2017; Nieto et al., 2016; Sadlon & Lamson, 2010)*.

 

The essential oils, also known as volatile oils, are the natural and concentrated extracts. They are derived from the plants (flowers, leaves, barks, stems, seeds, berries, resins, or roots). The steam distillation, hydro-distillation, hydro-diffusion, or solvent extraction can be used to extract the essential oils. The composition of the essential oils is complex and consists mostly of synergistically acting terpenes, terpenoids (phenols, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, or ethers) and aromatic compounds (Man et al., 2019).

Making a room spray takes only a few minutes. You will need the following equipment (ACHS, n.d.):

  • The essential oils – several drops (see below the general recommendations for the dilution)
  • The empty spray bottle ( I like to use the 1-2 oz bottles to make small batches)
  • The solvents such as alcohol, glycerine, water, or vinegar
  • A cylinder and rod for mixing
  • A pipette (for accurate drop count)

Because pure essential oils are very highly concentrated, they have to be diluted! For example, the general safety guidelines recommend diluting the pure essential oils until the final product contains only up to 4% of the essential oil. It means to use up to 6 to 24 drops of the essential oil per 1 ounce of solvent or 12-48 drops – per 2 ounces of solvent (ACHS, 2019; NAHA, 2019). A little amount literally goes a long way!

Additionally, the higher the quality of the essential oils, the better! Remember that you will be inhaling and absorbing all of the constituents of the essential oils into your body (Herman & Herman, 2015). Organic or wild-crafted 100% pure essential oils are the best, and their aroma is irresistible. Moreover, the pure, unadulterated essential oils can have a different effect on the body (Boren et al., 2015).*

Book your holistic nutrition and lifestyle consultation or health coaching session today! The initial 20-minute exploration session is free of charge.

Nataliya.

 

References:

American College of Healthcare Sciences (ACHS). (2019). Three common and dangerous essential oil mistakes. Retrieved from http://info.achs.edu/blog/aromatherapy-essential-oil-dangers-and-safety

ACHS. (n.d.). Three irresistible recipes for the aromatherapy body spray. Retrieved from http://info.achs.edu/blog/natural-holiday-perfumes-sprays-essential-oils

Boren, K. E., Young, D. G., Woolley, C. L., Smith, B. L., & Carlson, R. E. (2015). Detecting Essential Oil Adulteration. Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, 2:132. doi: 10.4172/2380-2391.1000132

Elshafie, H. S., & Camele, I. (2017). An Overview of the Biological Effects of Some Mediterranean Essential Oils on Human Health. BioMed Research International2017, 9268468. doi:10.1155/2017/9268468

Herman, A. & Herman, A. P. (2015), Essential oils for transdermal drug delivery. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 67: 473-485. doi:10.1111/jphp.12334

Man, A., Santacroce, L., Jacob, R., Mare, A., & Man, L. (2019). Antimicrobial Activity of Six Essential Oils Against a Group of Human Pathogens: A Comparative Study. Pathogens (Basel, Switzerland)8(1), 15. doi:10.3390/pathogens8010015

NAHA. (2019). Safety information. Retrieved from https://naha.org/explore-aromatherapy/safety

Nieto, G., Ros, G., & Castillo, J. (2018). Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, L.): A Review. Medicines (Basel, Switzerland), 5(3), 98. doi:10.3390/medicines5030098

Sadlon, A. E., & Lamson, D. W. (2010). Immune-Modifying and Antimicrobial Effects of Eucalyptus Oil and Simple Inhalation Devices. Alternative Medicine Review, 15(1): 33-47. Retrieved from http://archive.foundationalmedicinereview.com/publications/15/1/33.pdf

 

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

 

Making Herbal Powders

Hello! This week, I made my own herbal powders from whole, organic, recently harvested herbs for the first time! Once I opened the packages with the Motherwort leaves and Hawthorn berries, the inspiring process of creation has started!

I used a mortar and pestle and Vitamix blender to crush and pulverize all components of these herbs into a fine powder. Both of these herbal powders smelled and tasted so fresh and looked so bright!

 

 

The Hawthorn Berries powder and capsules:

Modern herbal therapy implements Hawthorn berries, leaves, and flowers. The Hawthorn plant has beneficial cardiovascular effects* (Holubarsch, Colucci, & Eha, 2018).

 

 

 

The Motherwort powder and capsules: The Motherwort plant has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antimicrobial, tissue-protective, and sedative effects* (Fierascu et al., 2019).

I used to take herbal powders prepared by the Ayurvedic practitioners as a Complementary and Alternative Medical (CAM) approach for different purposes: to relieve stomach discomfort, alleviate muscle pain, improve digestion and elimination, decrease stress, and reduce congestion* (Patwardhan, 2014). I loved Ayurvedic herbal preparations! Each one smelled and tasted differently and affected my body and mind in a positive way.

The herbal powders can be taken in a powdered form or as capsules. The herbal powders made at home can be the purest and the freshest ones, as you can select the best quality herbs (organic, wild-crafted, or even home-grown) and the best quality capsules while avoiding any other ingredients that seem unnecessary (fillers, pesticides, additives, preservatives, etc.). I was pleasantly surprised when I discovered that the Apothecary Shoppe listed the date of the harvest on each package with whole herbs. You can make the herbal powders in small batches to ensure freshness and maximum potency and prevent rancidity. Each batch can be stored in a refrigerator with a moisture absorbent packets.

It is best to contact a Certified Herbalist, an Ayurvedic Practitioner, or Naturopathic Doctor to inquire which herbs can be a good fit for your body as a part of the CAM approach to healing and wellness. In the United States, about 38% of adults (every 4 in 10) and  12% of children (every 1 in 9) are using some type of CAM.

The most common forms of CAM used in the U.S. include nutrition and diet-based therapy, herbs, Yoga, Pilates, Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, energy healing/Reiki, and many others (John Hopkins Medicine, 2019; NIH, 2017).  The CAM approaches are non-mainstream and can be used together with conventional mainstream medicine (NIH, 2019).

Contact me today to discuss your nutrition goals! Our initial  20-minute discussion is free of charge. To help you succeed with your health and wellness goals, I offer holistic nutrition consultations as well as wellness coaching.

References:

Fierascu, R. C., Fierascu, I., Ortan, A., Fierascu, I. C., Anuta, V., Velescu, B. S., … Dinu-Pirvu, C. E. (2019). Leonurus cardiaca L. as a Source of Bioactive Compounds: An Update of the European Medicines Agency Assessment Report (2010). BioMed Research International2019, 4303215. doi:10.1155/2019/4303215

Holubarsch, C., Colucci, W. S., & Eha, J. (2018). Benefit-Risk Assessment of Crataegus Extract WS 1442: An Evidence-Based Review. American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs : Drugs, Devices, and Other Interventions18(1), 25–36. doi:10.1007/s40256-017-0249-9

John Hopkins Medicine. (2019). Types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Retrieved from https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/types-of-complementary-and-alternative-medicine

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2017). The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States. Retrieved from https://nccih.nih.gov/research/statistics/2007/camsurvey_fs1.htm

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2019). Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s in a Name? Retrieved from https://nccih.nih.gov/health/integrative-health

Patwardhan, B. (2014). Bridging Ayurveda with evidence-based scientific approaches in medicine. The EPMA Journal5(1), 19. doi:10.1186/1878-5085-5-19

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is for educational purposes only.

Quinoa Pancakes

Happy Independence Day weekend to everybody! It is a middle of the year and almost a middle of the summer. What is your favorite summer-time activity? For me, it is the appreciation of the long days filled with the sunshine and the delicious and colorful summer foods. 

Today, I’m sharing with you one of my favorite recipes – the quinoa pancakes.

It needs just a few ingredients, is easy to make, and tastes very good. Actually, both the sweet and savory versions of this recipe can be enjoyed year-round. 

 

 

 

You will need the following ingredients:

Quinoa (white, red, or multicolored), ripe banana, flax seeds, and some water.

That’s it. You may use a little bit of coconut oil, however, it is optional if you use a non-stick skillet.

You will need this equipment: a bowl, blender, and non-stick skillet. The amount of preparation time can be reduced if you have more than one skillet. I typically use 3 small non-stick skillets, and in this case, the total preparation time takes about 5-7 minutes. 

What I love about this recipe is that the pancakes have a neutral taste and can be enjoyed with both sweet and savory meals or snacks. As a sweet version, I like to serve them with berries, fruits, and coconut yogurt. For a savory twist, I serve them with veggies, salads, and dressings (taco-like style). On this image below, you can see 3 pancakes, each served with the arugula leaves, slices of tomato and red onion, and avocado cubes. In this version, the pancakes work as flatbreads or soft tacos. 

Additionally, I soaked and sprouted the quinoa seeds, which is an easy step that can improve the digestibility and nutrient availability. Moreover, soaked and sprouted quinoa gives you more pancakes if compared with those made from the unsoaked quinoa. Note that this recipe does not need any flour; the whole quinoa seeds were soaked and sprouted and blended together with banana, flax seeds, and water. Here is a full recipe, enjoy!

By the way, it is the middle of the year, and I’m wondering how are your new year resolution goals doing? How successful have you been so far? Which obstacles came your way?

Let’s discuss how I can help you to get back on track during the next 6 months.

Our first 20-minute discovery session is free of charge, and I can work with you as a wellness coach or/and a nutrition consultant, depending on your needs. Contact me today, I’m happy to see how I can help!

In best health,

Nataliya.

Blueberry Acai Smoothie

Hello! The summer is almost here, and I’ve been experimenting with new and delicious recipes, as always. The bounty of summer brings a nice variety of local and fresh fruits and vegetables, and it is fun to play with them in the kitchen and taste new flavorful creations.

Today, I’d like to share a very simple but super delicious smoothie – a blueberry acai smoothie. I decided to make my own version after I tasted a blueberry acai smoothie bowl in a local raw food cafe (The Judahlicious cafe in San Francisco). Their acai bowl was amazing. However, mine turned out pretty good, as well! For this recipe, you will need raw cashews, frozen blueberries, frozen acai, dates, and filtered water.

You will need the following equipment: a good blender (such as Vitamix, Blendtec, or a similar one), and serving glasses.

I like to use raw, unsalted, soaked cashews because, after being soaked overnight, they become soft and plump and have a different taste and texture. Depending on the type of raw dried cashews, they can expand up to two times in their size after soaking. For example, for this recipe, I soaked 1 cup of dried cashews overnight, and they expanded to 2 cups. Note that the standard nutritional information such as the calories, fat, protein, and carbohydrate content, is usually provided for the dried nuts.

As for the blueberries, in this recipe, the frozen ones worked very well; I did not have to add any ice. I usually buy fresh, organic, and local blueberries that are in season and freeze them. Also, I like keeping some of the wild frozen blueberries in stock. The dates that I love to use in my recipes are the Medjool dates.

For this recipe, I used a frozen acai that was available at Trader Joe’s. Also, different acai powders or purees are available at other retailers; however, I have not tried them all in my recipes yet.

The recipe:

  • 2 cups raw cashews, soaked overnight and drained (an equivalent of 1 cup of raw, dried, unsoaked cashews)
  • 4 cups of frozen blueberries
  • 4 cups of water
  • 3 dates, pitted
  • 1 packet of frozen acai (about 100 grams)

Yield: 8 cups, Serving size – 1 cup

Method of preparation:

  • Place cashews, blueberries, acai, dates, and water into a blender
  • Blend well until smooth and creamy
  • Serve immediately or store in a refrigerator for up to 3 days.
  • Before serving, decorate with your favorite nuts, seeds, herbs, or spices.

Enjoy the deliciousness!

Nataliya

Cauliflower “Rice”

Hello!

I’m excited to share with you my version of the recipe called Cauliflower “Rice”.

This recipe is so quick to make that it became one of my staples!

I wanted to highlight the benefits of this recipe:

It is 100% grain-free and gluten-free!
It’s made with fresh vegetables and herbs – it means that your body will get lots of fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals!
It is low in fat and calories and has no added oil – it means it is perfect for those who watches the calories or tries to lose weight. (You can certainly add some olive, avocado or sesame oil to it if you like; however, I encourage you to try it first and see how it tastes to you.)
It has no additives or sweeteners; however, it tastes slightly sweet and pleasantly delicious because of the natural carbohydrates present in carrots and cauliflower.
This recipe is 100% raw and uncooked; however, you can steam or cook the cauliflower (and even carrots) if this is your preference.

You will need the following ingredients:

cauliflower, carrots, onion, scallion, avocado, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar,  and optional Himalayan salt.

You will need this equipment:

a cutting board, a knife, a food processor (I used a Cuisinart), and a mixing bowl

THE FULL RECIPE: Cauliflower “Rice”

Ingredients:

2 cups cauliflower florets, chopped
3 carrots, sliced
1/2 onion, sliced
1 scallion, shopped
2 Tbs parsley, chopped
1 avocado, cubed
1/2 lemon, juiced
1 Tbs raw apple cider vinegar
Optional: 1/16 tsp sea salt

Yield: 4 cups

Serving size: 1 cup

Method of preparation:

Put all ingredients (except avocado) in a food processor and pulse until the mixture combines homogenous.
Transfer the mixture into a bowl, add the cubes of the avocado, and mix it all well.
Test the taste and adjust as needed by adding more salt.
Serve immediately with any meal or as a snack.
Store in a refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Here is a quick video on how to make this delicious recipe:

Let me know if you have any questions!

Enjoy!

Nataliya.

Happy New Year! Feliz Navidad!

Happy New Year to everyone I know and don’t know yet!

Have you counted all the blessings that you have experienced in the 2018?

When I reflect on the passing 2018, I remember so many wonderful events and supportive people! Thank you all so much, you shaped my life, and I feel so grateful!

My wishes for you is to have a wonderful New 2019 Year! May it be bright, colorful, energizing, and filled with lots of smiles, laughs, support, blessings, and love!

To celebrate the transition, I prepared the raw vegan pumpkin mini-pies, carrot and orange juices, and fermented beet kvass (the recipes are coming soon). Cheers!

As always, I’m happy to hear from you – your questions, ideas, recipes, comments, etc.

See you in the 2019! 🙂

Nataliya.

 

 

“Burgers”! Vegan and Raw

I’m excited to finally share with you a very delicious recipe: Raw Vegan “Burgers”!

I made them for the first time around Thanksgiving holiday, and later I experimented with the recipe and tried a few different versions of it.

The bottom line: these “burgers” do not have any animal ingredients, so please do not expect that the taste and texture will be just as it usually is in an animal-based product.

However, these vegan “burgers” are still super delicious, satisfying, filling, and quite addictive in a good way (meaning that it could be difficult to stop after eating just one “burger”). The recommended serving size for this recipe is about 2 or 3 “burgers”, depending on their size, so it means you can eat more than one!

I just wanted to mentioned one more thing: some people pay attention to the color of the vegan “burger”, and, as I learned, it mostly depends on the ingredients that you use.

This recipe will have a brownish-reddish-purple color because of the beets, and if you decided to replace the beets with a green vegetable (such as celery), the color of your product will be brownish-green. As you can see on this picture, the colors are different, but the taste and texture will be similar.

What you will need:

  • Ingredients:
    • nuts, seeds, vegetables, herbs, and spices.
  • Equipment:
    • a knife, cutting board, food processor (I like Cuisinart), large mixing bowl.

Method of preparation:

  • Process the nuts and seeds into a fine powder.
  • Process the vegetables and herbs into a smooth mass.
  • Combine the dry and wet ingredients, form patties, and assemble them into a “burger” meal.
  • The whole process takes about 15-20 minutes.

THE FULL RECIPE:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 2 cups sunflower seeds
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped (1/2 cup)
  • 1 small beet, chopped (1/2 cup)
  • 1 carrot, chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 small handful parsley, chopped
  • 2 Tbs ground flax seeds
  • 3 Tbs nutritional yeast
  • 2 Tbs dried herbs (Italian seasoning)
  • Optional: 1/16 tsp sea salt

Yield: 5 cups or 9 burgers, Serving size: 2-3 “burgers”

Method of preparation:

  1. Process spices, nuts, and seeds in a food processor into a powder and set aside in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Process all vegetables and fresh herbs in food processor into a smooth mass.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, combine processed dried and wet ingredients using a large spoon or your hands, until it becomes a homogenous mass (if it is too wet, add more of the dried ingredients such as extra powdered nuts or seeds). The final texture should be not too soft or too wet.
  4. Measure about 1/2 cup of the mixture to make one patty.
  5. To serve, place a patty on a lettuce or cabbage leaf, and decorate with slices of bell peppers, tomatoes, onions, and parsley.
  6. Store in a refrigerator for up to 3 days, freeze up to 2 weeks, or serve immediately and enjoy!

Finally, I’m including my quick video with some ideas on how to make a “burger” meal and serve it in a beautiful and delicious way. Hope you find it helpful.

The inspiration for this recipe came from the book by Baird and Rodwell (referenced below).

Bon appetit and happy holidays!

Nataliya.

References:

Baird, L. & Rodwel, J. (2005). The Complete Book of Raw Food. Healthy Living Books: New York, NY

Pomegranate Seeds

Do you like pomegranate seeds? They are available only once a year, usually around the holiday season, in November and December.

Tasting delicious and looking gorgeous, they can add beautiful decor to any dish (think about a salad, dessert, main dish, or a breakfast smoothie bowl). But this is not all – pomegranate seeds have many health benefits!

They are rich in polyphenols, flavonoids, antioxidants, anthocyanins, tannins, alkaloids, simple organic acids, vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium. Pomegranate seeds are small but mighty inhibitors of inflammation and have anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive qualities (Zarfeshany, Asgary, & Javanmard, 2014; Shahindokht, 2018).

Do you know how to get the pomegranate seeds out in a fast and non-messy way? I can show you one idea; it takes slightly more than a minute to get all the seeds out from a pomegranate.

You will need the following equipment:

  • a bowl
  • a cutting board
  • a knife
  • a ladle or an oversized spoon

 

 

 

The steps:

  1. Wash the pomegranate and cut it in half (or quarters, if it is a big fruit).
  2. Put a bowl into a sink, take a piece of a pomegranate in your hand, and turn it upside down so that the seeds are facing the bowl.
  3. Start tapping on a pomegranate using a ladle, until all seeds come out into a bowl. One fruit can yield about 1/2 cup or more of the seeds.
  4. Use immediately or store the seeds in a glass jar in a refrigerator for up to 3 days.
  5. Add to your salads, smoothie bowls, desserts, or main dishes.

Here is a quick video that explains all the steps:

If you know a better way to remove the pomegranate seeds, let us hear from you! 🙂

Enjoy!

Nataliya

 

The Homemade Beans: Yummy!

Recently, I had to cook a batch of soybeans for a client. Yes, they were organic and non-GMO, and it took some time to find. If you are lucky to live near a Natural Food Store such as Rainbow Grocery in San Francisco or others that carry them in bulk, that’s great. Online shopping is another option; the Nuts.com, Amazon, and some farmers sell the dried beans online.

Dried soybeans.

Step 1. Soak the beans.

Before I soak the beans, I like to rinse them once. Then, in a bowl, I put 1 cup of beans and add 4 cups of cold water. Why so much water? The beans expand about 3 times from their dried size and they soak up, like a sponge, a lot of water. At this point, I add a teaspoon of lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to assist with the fermentation process. Then, I leave the beans on the counter overnight or for at least 8 hours. Read the recipe here.

This is how the beans look after soaking. Notice their expanded size. If you look closer, you will see the tiny sprouting tails.

Step 2. Cook the beans.

After soaking, I drain the water, rinse the beans, place them into a pot, and add about 2 cups of water. I bring them to a gentle boil and cook on the lowest temperature for about 10-15 minutes. After I turn the heat off, I let the beans sweat under the closed lid for 10-15 minutes. (The cooking time differs for different types of legumes, but in general, it takes less time to cook pre-soaked beans.)

Fully cooked soybeans. They expanded just a bit more during cooking and sweating process.

Step 3. Decide how you want to eat them.

If I plan to eat the beans on the same day, I usually drain the liquid and add the beans to salads, main dishes, soups, casseroles, or snacks. If I want to eat them a few days later, I do not drain them and keep the pot in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. If I plan to freeze them (which I rarely do as they usually run out after 2 days), then I would drain them first, and them freeze in portion-size containers.

Step 4. Making soymilk.

This time, I wanted to experiment and make my own organic, non-GMO soymilk.

I soaked and cooked the beans, and let it cool. I had about 1 and 1/2 cups of cooked beans and about the same amount of cooking liquid. Then, I blended the beans and the cooking liquid in a blender. After that, I poured the mixture into a nut milk bag to separate the liquid from the solids. After squeezing the liquid out well, I got about 3 cups of delicious, silky, smooth, slightly sweet soymilk. I think it is worth trying the homemade soymilk at least once in a lifetime because the taste and the texture are amazing and way superior to the packaged soymilks from the stores. Notice that I did not add any sweeteners, salt, or other ingredients; the soymilk was amazingly delicious in its plain version and it had no beany or pasty taste. It can be stored in a refrigerator for up to 3 days, and used in smoothies or Buddha bowls.

Homemade soymilk and the bean balls.

Step 5. What to do with the soybean pulp?

The soybean pulp that remained in a nut milk bag can be used in different ways. The fastest way is to put it into a compost. However, my favorite way is to utilize it into a recipe as it is full of nutrients and fiber. This time, I mixed it with some ground flax seeds, oregano, garlic, onion, salt, and lemon juice and rolled them up into the savory bean balls (falafel-like) and served them as snacks.

Hope you found this post interesting and got some inspiration for trying new recipes. Feel free to leave any comments.

The Recipe: Homemade soy milk

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup soybeans, dried
  • 4 cups water for soaking and cooking

Yield:  1 cup cooked beans or 3 cups of soy milk

Equipment: a bowl, a pot, a nut milk bag

Preparation:

  • Place the dried beans into a bowl and add 2 cups of water.
  • Soak overnight or for 8 hours.
  • Drain soaking water, rinse the beans.
  • Place soaked beans into a pot, add 2 cups of water, bring to boil and simmer on low heat for 10-15 minutes.
  • Turn the heat off, and let the beans sweat under the lid for another 10-15 minutes. Let cool.
  • In a blender, blend the beans together with a cooking liquid until smooth.
  • Pour the mixture into a nut milk bag and squeeze as much liquid out as you can. This is the soy milk.
  • Pour the soy milk in a cup and enjoy the pure deliciousness!
  • Pour the rest of it into a glass jar and store in a refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Remove the pulp from the nut milk bag and either compost it or include it in other recipes. You can mix it with some ground flax seeds, spices, and salt and make the bean balls.

Cheers to healthy and fun eating!

Nataliya.